Skim Health 2.24.17

Categories: News, Other, Skim Health

Top health articles of interest circulating in the media this week, 2.24.17.

  • When it comes to sustaining weight loss once achieved, a new study suggests that special programs designed for maintenance are critical for helping people keep pounds off. Through regular contact and support with an expert who discussed weight loss plans and the positive effects of weight loss, participants in the controlled study who had support gained an average of 1.5 lbs back over time, while those without gained an average of 5lbs.
  • When doctors behave rudely, research suggests it’s important to speak out. A study recently revealed that complications in patients post-surgery were more common when a surgeon had received previous complaints for bad behavior over the past couple of years. 
  • Ever scratch your head over a sell-by date label? Is it still safe to consume? Big changes are coming, according to the Food Marketing Institute and the Grocery Manufacturers Association, who will be pushing for easier to digest dates on grocery products such as “Use By” and “Best if Used By.” Since 91 percent of consumers have thrown away “past-date” food that may still be perfectly safe to eat, this will have a positive impact on reducing food waste.
  • While uncertainty looms over the future of the Affordable Care Act, a recent article in the CT Mirror points out that for free clinics across the country, a surge in demand for free healthcare may be in store for an already in-demand service. Pointing to misconceptions about the need for free clinics following the passage of the ACA, Nicole Lamoureux, CEO of the National Association of Free & Charitable Clinics, observed a significant decrease in donations in recent years despite a consistent need for care.
  • Poor women are more likely to lose their jobs when diagnosed with breast cancer, according to a study highlighted in PBS Newshour. While it is estimated that 20-30 percent of women diagnosed lose their jobs a result of taking time for cancer treatments, poor women were 4 times more likely within this sample to lose their positions by the end of their cancer treatment.